In Vietnam: The Ride to Work

It’s very hard to live in Vietnam without a motorbike or scooter to get around. When I first experienced the apparently chaotic traffic of Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), I felt it would be crazy to get a bike. So I used taxis for a while, which are cheap by western standards. Buses in HCMC are also quite good, and very cheap – the average fare is less than $1. Then I tried Grab Bikes and Uber Bikes, which are basically motorcycle taxis, summoned via a phone app. At first, it was terrifying to ride on the back of these bikes, but the drivers are highly skilled and mostly quite conservative drivers – their livelihood depends on keeping clients alive.

When I left HCMC, I was hoping to find a city where I could get around on foot or push-bike with the occasional use of bus and taxi. Da Nang is a city about the same size as Adelaide, and just as spread out, if not more so. The bus routes do not seem to have a pattern designed to get people in and out of the city in any logical manner, at least not from the area where I live. There are no Grab or Uber bikes, though there are Grab and Uber taxis which are relatively cheap. An English teacher’s timetable here usually involves working a few hours each weekday evening, and then weekend mornings and evenings. In other words, multiple trips for relatively short working hours. Using taxis is inconvenient. They are not the most reliable and you have to build in a time buffer to allow for situations where the taxi can’t find you or just doesn’t show up.

So getting a motorbike was probably inevitable. You can rent one for about $50 a month which is what I’ve done. For that, the company will come and fix it for you if it breaks down, and service it for you every two months. The traffic in Da Nang is nowhere near as chaotic as in HCMC, though it is crazy enough. My ride to and from work in the city can be quite breathtaking, in more ways than one. But in particular, the ride over the Dragon Bridge at night always thrills me.

Once you’ve ridden for a while, you pick up the unwritten rules: peripheral vision is paramount; nudge forward at intersections and roundabouts until the traffic from your left stops, then proceed; don’t tangle with trucks or buses, their drivers take no prisoners; use your horn all the time to let vehicles around you know you’re there; at intersections and roundabouts, try to ride in a pack and keep downstream of other bikes, using them as a barrier between you and oncoming traffic; don’t expect indicators to be used; don’t bother with road rage, nobody else does; don’t be shocked by anything you see, such as babies sitting on wicker stools between the driver’s legs, children with no helmets, women riding side-saddle, constant use of mobile phones even in the heaviest traffic, seemingly impossible loads of crates, boxes, building equipment, ladders, pipes. Having said that, I’ve only seen a handful of crashes, none of them too serious, and people generally have a co-operative and tolerant attitude towards other road users.

So here’s a recording of my ride to work on a relatively quiet Sunday evening.

Tip: click on the Settings icon and change the speed to 2x, then click on the full screen icon. If you want to skip the suburban commute, the Dragon Bridge to city bit starts around 7 mins 15 secs

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— Copyright Mike Hopkins 2017

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7 thoughts on “In Vietnam: The Ride to Work

  1. really enjoyed watching that Mike .. seemed quite well behaved : i would suggest some gloves ( even if fingerless ) as gravel rash sucks! the dragon bridge was some sight! ps just about to sell my C90 and get a honda innova anf125 .. c90 too much of a collectors item and polishing not for me! .. also c90 max 40mph .. not safe over here ! andy

    sent adstagg

    >

    • Yes Andy, Da Nang is tame compared to HCMC, but it’s much worse on weekdays than in this video. Agreed about gloves. Will look out for some tomorrow. Vietnamese are not particularly into protective equipment. Most adults wear cheap helmets, but carry their babies and young children on the motorbikes mostly unprotected. Apparently it’s commonly believed that helmets prevent brain development in children.

      Sorry to hear of the C90’s demise. 40 mph on a C90 certainly feels fast, and is fine around town, but not for the open road.

  2. Fabulous, Mike. I really enjoyed this. So reminiscent of our time there (no motorbikes though) in 2015. Skipped bits, as you suggested, but loved the Dragon Bridge. Am I mistaken, or were your knuckles white?

  3. Thanks for this Mike. I enjoyed it much more than I expected to! It was kind of intimate in a way and there was a real visceral sense of being right there that probably can’t be captured in any other way.

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